Treasures

Our Current Items

Look at what has arrived April 4, 2018

Mark your Calendars Fairy Garden Classes begin April 14, 2018

Call Today to sign up for Aunt Elsie’s Fairy Garden Class. 801-561-5557

Here are a few Fairy/Garden items.

 

Here is your sign

History of April Fools’ Day

(Copied from Wikipedia)

April Fools’ Day (sometimes called All Fools’ Day) is an annual celebration in some European and Western countries commemorated on April 1 by playing practical jokes and spreading hoaxes. The jokes and their victims are called April fools. People playing April Fool jokes often expose their prank by shouting “April fool” at the unfortunate victim(s). Some newspapers, magazines and other published media report fake stories, which are usually explained the next day or below the news section in smaller letters. Although popular since the 19th century, the day is not a public holiday in any country.

Aside from April Fools’ Day, the custom of setting aside a day for the playing of harmless pranks upon one’s neighbour has historically been relatively common in the world.[1]

Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales (1392) may contain the first recorded association between April 1 and foolishness, although this claim is controversial.[2] In Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales, the “Nun’s Priest’s Tale” is set Syn March bigan thritty dayes and two.[3] Readers apparently understood this line to mean “32 March”, i.e. April 1.[citation needed][4] In Chaucer’s tale, the vain cock Chauntecleer is tricked by a fox.

However, it is not clear that Chaucer was referencing April 1. Modern scholars believe that there is a copying error in the extant manuscripts and that Chaucer actually wrote, Syn March was gon.[5] If so, the passage would have originally meant 32 days after March, i.e. 2 May,[6] the anniversary of the engagement of King Richard II of England to Anne of Bohemia, which took place in 1381.

In 1508, French poet Eloy d’Amerval referred to a poisson d’avril (April fool, literally “Fish of April”), a possible reference to the holiday.[7] In 1539, Flemish poet Eduard de Dene wrote of a nobleman who sent his servants on foolish errands on April 1.[6] In 1686, John Aubrey referred to the holiday as “Fooles holy day”, the first British reference.[6] On April 1, 1698, several people were tricked into going to the Tower of London to “see the Lions washed”.[6]

In the Middle Ages, New Year’s Day was celebrated on March 25 in most European towns.[8] In some areas of France, New Year’s was a week-long holiday ending on April 1.[9][10] Some writers suggest that April Fools’ originated because those who celebrated on January 1 made fun of those who celebrated on other dates.[9] The use of January 1 as New Year’s Day was common in France by the mid-16th century,[6] and this date was adopted officially in 1564 by the Edict of Roussillon.

In the Netherlands, the origin of April Fools’ Day is often attributed to the Dutch victory at Brielle in 1572, where the Spanish Duke Álvarez de Toledo was defeated. “Op 1 april verloor Alva zijn bril.” is a Dutch proverb, which can be translated to: “On the first of April, Alva lost his glasses.” In this case, the glasses (“bril” in Dutch) serve as a metaphor for Brielle. This theory, however, provides no explanation for the international celebration of April Fools’ Day.

Although no Biblical scholar or historian are known to have mentioned a relationship, some have expressed the belief that the origins of April Fool’s Day may go back to the Genesis flood narrative. In a 1908 edition of the Harper’s Weekly cartoonist Bertha R. McDonald wrote: “authorities gravely back with it to the time of Noah and the ark. The London Public Advertiser of March 13, 1769, printed: ‘The mistake of Noah sending the dove out of the ark before the water had abated, on the first day of April, and to perpetuate the memory of this deliverance it was thought proper, whoever forgot so remarkable a circumstance, to punish them by sending them upon some sleeveless errand similar to that ineffectual message upon which the bird was sent by the patriarch’.”[11]

Did You Know?

example 3

Example 1

Example 2

  DESKS  (The Antiques Dictionary)

Taken from Antiques directory By Judith & Martin Miller

In common with its European counterparts, the American slant front desk developed primarily from the scrutoire or escritoire, which in form is similar to the one illustrated as in example 1. The form gained more refined lines when heightened and set on a cabriole-legged stand, as in examples 2 & 3, but the requirements of portability was diminishing, and portable furniture was no longer fashionable. The logic focusing the space below the desk  was not to be resisted. A false start was made with starting to fill the stand with drawers, as in example 3, but the real  solution as cabinet-making skills developed was to set the desk on top a chest of drawers.

 

30 % off Store Owned Easter Decorations

Stop by today to see what else is on Sale.

Look what has arrived at of 2-28-2018

Hat Ladies

These Amazing Ladies came in for a spring/Easter hat class. Look at how creative and beautiful they all are.

THANK YOU Ladies for such a fun time.

Did you know?

History of Palm Sunday, copied from Wikipedia.

Palm Sunday is a Christian moveable feast that falls on the Sunday before Easter. The feast commemorates Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem, an event mentioned in each of the four canonical Gospels.[3]

In many Catholic and Episcopal denominations, worship services on Palm Sunday include a procession of the faithful carrying palms, representing the palm branches the crowd scattered in front of Jesus as he rode into Jerusalem. The difficulty of procuring palms in unfavorable climates led to their substitution with branches of native trees, including box, olive, willow, and yew. The Sunday was often named after these substitute trees, as in Yew Sunday, or by the general term Branch Sunday.

In the accounts of the four canonical Gospels, Jesus’ triumphal entry into Jerusalem takes place about a week before his Resurrection.[4][5][6][7][8]

Christian theologians believe that the symbolism is captured prophetically in the Old Testament: Zechariah 9:9 “The Coming of Zion’s King – See, your king comes to you, righteous and victorious, lowly and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey”. It suggests that Jesus was declaring he was the King of Israel to the anger of the Sanhedrin.

According to the Gospels, Jesus Christ rode a donkey into Jerusalem, and the celebrating people there laid down their cloaks and small branches of trees in front of him, and sang part of Psalm 118: 25–26… Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord. We bless you from the house of the Lord ….[2][4][5][6]

The symbolism of the donkey may refer to the Eastern tradition that it is an animal of peace, versus the horse, which is the animal of war.[1] A king would have ridden a horse when he was bent on war and ridden a donkey to symbolize his arrival in peace. Jesus’ entry to Jerusalem would have thus symbolized his entry as the Prince of Peace, not as a war-waging king.[1][2]

“Flevit super illam” (He wept over it); by Enrique Simonet, 1892.

In Luke 19:41 as Jesus approaches Jerusalem, he looks at the city and weeps over it (an event known as Flevit super illam in Latin), foretelling the suffering that awaits the city in the events of the destruction of the Second Temple.

In many lands in the ancient Near East, it was customary to cover in some way the path of someone thought worthy of the highest honour. The Hebrew Bible (2 Kings 9:13) reports that Jehu, son of Jehoshaphat, was treated this way. Both the Synoptic Gospels and the Gospel of John report that people gave Jesus this form of honour. In the synoptics the people are described as laying their garments and cut rushes on the street, whereas John specifies fronds of palm (Greek phoinix). In Jewish tradition, the palm is one of the Four Species carried for Sukkot, as prescribed for rejoicing at Leviticus 23:40.

In the Greco-Roman culture of the Roman Empire, which strongly influenced Christian tradition, the palm branch was a symbol of triumph and victory. It became the most common attribute of the goddess Nike or Victory.[9] For contemporary Roman observers, the procession would have evoked the Roman triumph,[10] when the triumphator laid down his arms and wore the toga, the civilian garment of peace that might be ornamented with emblems of the palm.[11] Although the Epistles of Paul refer to Jesus as “triumphing”, the entry into Jerusalem may not have been regularly pictured as a triumphal procession in this sense before the 13th century.[12] In ancient Egyptian religion, the palm was carried in funeral processions and represented eternal life. The palm branch later was used as a symbol of Christian martyrs and their spiritual victory or triumph over death.[13] In Revelation 7:9, the white-clad multitude stand before the throne and Lamb holding palm branches.

Gnomes, Hedgehogs, and Men in trees